Frameworks in Health and Quality Website References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About chronic diseases. https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/index.htm. Reviewed September 8, 2018. Accessed September 28, 2018.

  2. Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy. Concept Series Paper on Disease Management. AMCP. Alexandria, VA.

  3. PubMed Health. What are disease management programs? National Institutes of Health. December 2016.
    Available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0072596/. Accessed August 23, 2018.

  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health and economic costs of chronic diseases. https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/costs/index.htm. Updated October 23, 2018. Accessed November 2, 2018.

Frameworks in Health and Quality Program References

  • Schizophrenia Relapse Reduction Program

    • American Psychiatric Association. Depressive disorders. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; 2013:155-188.
    • Lehman AF, Lieberman JA, Dixon, LB, et al; for the Work Group on Schizophrenia, American Psychiatric Association. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Schizophrenia. II. Formulation and Implementation of a Treatment Plan. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc; 2004.
    • Robinson D, Woerner MG, AIvir JM, et al. Predictors of relapse following response from a first episode of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999;56(3):241-247.
    • Schennach R, Naber D, Ruther E, et al. Predictors of relapse in the year after hospital discharge among patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatr Serv. 2012;63(1):87-90.
  • Understanding and Diagnosing Bipolar Disorder

    • American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Publishing; 2013.
    • Bipolar disorder. National Alliance on Mental Illness website. https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Bipolar-Disorder. 2015. Accessed July 6, 2017.
    • Blanco C, Compton WM, Saha TD, et al. Epidemiology of DSM-5 bipolar I disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III. J Psychiatr Res. 2017;84:310-317.
    • Dilsaver SC. An estimate of the minimum economic burden of bipolar I and II disorders in the United States: 2009. J Affect Disord. 2011;129(1-3):79-83.
    • Living with bipolar disorder: how far have we really come? National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association website. http://www.dbsalliance.org/pdfs/bphowfar1.pdf. Published 2001. Accessed June 21, 2017.
  • Value of Collaborative Care in Major Depressive Disorder

    • Chapman DP, Perry GS, Strine TW. The vital link between chronic disease and depressive disorders. Prev Chronic Dis. 2005;2(1):1-10.
    • Gelenberg AJ, Freeman MP, Markowitz JC, et al; for the Work Group on Major Depressive Disorder. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Major Depressive Disorder. 3rd ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association; 2010.
    • Greenberg PE, Fournier AA, Sisitsky T, Pike CT, Kessler RC. The economic burden of adults with major depressive disorder in the United States (2005 and 2010). J Clin Psychiatry. 2015;76(2):155-162.
  • Working Together to Support Adherence in Mental Health

    • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The SHARE Approach Achieving Patient-Centered Care with Shared Decisionmaking: A Brief for Administrators and Practice Leaders: Workshop Curriculum: Tool 9. April 2014. AHRQ Pub No. 14-0034-9-EF.
    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Innovations in Practice: Shared Decision Making in Mental Health. SMA 10-1121. Washington, DC. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); 2010.
    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Shared Decision Making: Making Recovery Real in Mental Health. SMA 10-1117. Washington, DC. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); 2010.
  • Collaborating for Improved Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) Management

    1. US Food and Drug Administration. Developing products for rare diseases and conditions.
      https://www.fda.gov/forindustry/developingproductsforrarediseasesconditions/default.htm. Accessed October 9, 2018.
    2. Takiar V, Caplan MJ. Polycystic kidney disease: pathogenesis and potential therapies. Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis. 2011; 1812(10):1337-1343.
    3. Hateboer N, v Dijk MA, Bogdanova N, et al. Comparison of phenotypes of polycystic kidney disease types 1 and 2.
      European PKD1-PKD2 Study Group. Lancet. 1999;353:103-107.
    4. Data on file. Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc; Rockville, MD. # JIN 004.
    5. Kelleher CL, McFann KK, Johnson AM, Schrier RW. Characteristics of hypertension in young adults with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease compared with the general US population. Am J Hypertens. 2004;17(11 Pt 1):1029-1034.
    6. Grantham JJ, Mulamalla S, Swenson-Fields KI. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2011;7:556-566.
    7. Grantham JJ, Torres VE, Chapman AB, et al. Volume progression in polycystic kidney disease. N Engl J Med. 2006;354:2122-2130.
    8. Schrier RW, Brosnahan G, Cadnapaphornchai MA, et al. Predictors of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2014;25(11):2399-2418.
    9. Masoumi A, Reed-Gitomer B, Kelleher C, Bekheirnia MR, Schrier RW. Developments in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2008;4(2):393-407.
    10. Ness B, Stovall K. Current recommendations for treating autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. JAAPA. 2016;29(12):24-28.